Shooting for the Moon with Ryan

Life in the World of Autism


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Getting What Holidays are All About

DSC04254There was a time when holidays had no meaning for Ryan. He didn’t understand the concept of trick-or-treating, and he was finished after ringing three door bells. He had no idea we were celebrating Thanksgiving and certainly wasn’t going to eat the turkey since it wasn’t one of his three preferred foods. Ryan wasn’t aware when it was the Christmas season, wasn’t interested in opening presents, and found all the lights and music over-stimulating.

But as time went by, Ryan finally started to get what holidays were all about. Last Halloween, Ryan couldn’t get enough of ringing door bells and looking inside of other people’s houses. He would have run in if had they let him. When he got home, I let him eat six pieces of candy. I was thrilled that Ryan actually wanted to eat candy, which doesn’t seem to make sense until you live with a child whose food choices are extremely limited.

This year, at age seven, Ryan finally gave me an answer when I asked him what he wanted to be for Halloween. For the first time, he cared about what he was going to be. When he made the request to be WALL-E, I was beside myself with excitement. I actually got to make him a costume instead of searching for any costume he could tolerate sensory wise.

I learned my lesson when Ryan was two years old. I found the most adorable lion costume at a consignment sale. It had a furry coat with an attached hood and mane. It even had furry pants and paws that fit over his shoes. Ryan could barely look at the costume, let along put his arm in the sleeve. I quickly turned him into a farmer instead, with a bandanna and denim overalls.

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I sold the lion costume back to the consignment sale the next year.

The first year that Ryan decided to eat turkey was exciting for the whole family.

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He had been doing feeding therapy for at least six months and his food choices were no longer limited to yogurt, hot dogs and grapes. Ryan also found out that he loved parades, even though they were loud and crowded. The drums in the marching bands were thrilling. The giant balloons, floats, and performers were all amazing to him.

As a preschooler, Ryan had no interest in presents or opening them. He had no idea what he wanted for Christmas at all. In fact, Christmas was just another day to him. He didn’t get the concept of celebrating a holiday. Yes, we saved money on Christmas presents when Ryan was little. But we all missed out on the Christmas morning magic.

Then, when Ryan was five, he surprised us by saying out of the blue “I want a train that goes around the bottom of the tree.” It was Christmas Eve and the first time Ryan ever requested anything for Christmas. I was overjoyed, and determined to get him what he requested. I ran to Wal-Mart to grab any type of train that was available. At the last minute, I was only able to find a small plastic battery operated train that fit on his wooden “Thomas” tracks. It was enough to fill Ryan with delight on Christmas morning.DSC07961

This year, Ryan is already asking about the real Santa vs. one of Santa’s helpers. Every time he sees a Santa Claus, he wants to know if he’s the real thing, because the Santa he saw at the store looks different from the Santa at the party. Ryan has only believed in Santa for a very short time. Is he already questioning it?

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Ryan has come a long way from not knowing the difference between a holiday and a regular day to participating in many of the holiday traditions. So what new tradition will finally have meaning for Ryan this Thanksgiving and Christmas season?  The greatest joy of celebrating a holiday with Ryan is watching him latch onto an aspect of the holiday that he previously didn’t get, which always makes the season even merrier and brighter!

 

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